Why there has been no sewing: a new sewing room

It feels a bit strange posting pictures of my new sewing area because I haven’t actually sewed anything in it yet, but I’ve been waiting a while to do this. We’ve moved house and have been camping in this room while work was done in the rest of the house. Today we got the bedroom back, so theoretically I now have space to sew and here it is!
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I’m going to need to sew a lot. I’m living further from work which means cycling instead of walking, but most of my existing clothes don’t work on a bike. The next thing I’m making is definitely a pair of trousers. The pattern’s already out and I know I have fabric for them somewhere in that pile under the stairs.

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Anyone got any recommendations for dress patterns you can cycle in? Trousers are all very well but I’d like some dresses too.

22 thoughts on “Why there has been no sewing: a new sewing room

  1. For dresses and skirts you can cycle in, check out The Slapdash Sewist, she often discusses the “bike-ability” of patterns!

  2. Great space! You will be checking on social media while sewing – perfect … regarding garments for biking… well… I see a lot of Dutch women biking in leggins and dresses/skirts… I have to far away to work to bike … good challenge – maybe good idea for PatternReview contest? or do it on your website?

  3. How exciting – a new sewing room so far so neat and tidy – long may that last!
    The first thing is, have you got a cross bar?! If so, forget it as it is impossible to swing your leg over the saddle in anything other than the most stretchy knits without hearing that sickening sound of a seam splitting.
    Last summer and following advice on a cycling sewist’s blog,I tried cycling in fuller skirts modestly held together between my knees with clothes pegs – somehow I always lost the pegs within half a mile of home, Not to be deterred (or waste the fuller skirts which I normally would never wear) I tried bulldog clips but they are an irritating distraction as they keep hitting the metal and never failed to amuse motorists waiting at traffic lights. So now I wear padded 3/4 length tights under not too tight skirts and so am comfortable and not flashing next weeks washing to the on coming traffic.

  4. Yay! I don’t cycle but I get around on a scooter so tunics and jersey knit dresses (short ones) with straight cut/easy-lose fit work fine. I wear silk shorts underneath to prevent tight snagging and accidental flashes XD Also, if the skirt is narrow you can put an invisible zipper into its back/side vents. Remember to re-zip after dismounting XD

  5. If you haven’t looked into making the Tania Culottes yet from Megan Nielsen, you totally should! It’s like a skirt/culottes specifically designed for biking! (And she just released them as a PDF pattern in addition to paper.)

      1. Me too, culottes was where I was going. The Tania culottes of course hardly look like culottes but a full skirt, but if you wanted something more tailored there are lots of vintage styles you could try from the 60s and 70s perhaps?!
        Lovely sewing room, what a great space!!

  6. I don’t have anything helpful to say about cycling I dresses I’m afraid; I always wear cycling shorts but I love the thought of cycling in a dress. I know Jorth cycles everywhere in a dress.

    Congrats on moving and on having a sewing space. Yay! I am looking forward to seeing lots of fabulous new things from you!

  7. How wonderful you’ve a new sewing space! And the move is over. Have fun with new clothes, I know you’ll come up with great options for biking, looking forward to seeing them!

  8. I find the padded knicks most comfy on the bike. I have a longish commute however & change at work. I’m in the process of making a tunic to wear over my knicks. I’m thinking mid thigh lengthy should cover me well.

  9. A new sewing space is always exciting! What about dresses that can be folded up or rolled up while biking and then unfolded or rolled down when you reach your destination? I saw a young woman wearing a beautiful lightweight silk sheath that she had cleverly folded up to her shoulders while on her bike which she then unfolded and wore over the capri length leggings that she had on while riding. She hopped off of her bike, arranged her clothing, changed her shoes and went on her way.

  10. buy a few basic (cheap) pairs of black leggings to wear purely for cycling if you intend to wear a dress. you can remove them when you get into work etc & you dont have to worry about pants getting wet/dirty on the ride….thats coming from 2 years of experience in Holland.
    Happy days.

  11. I cycle a lot and I have discovered I can simply add a box pleat to the skirt of almost any dress pattern that takes my fancy.

    It doesn’t work with every style of dress but it’s certainly made my life easier!

  12. Hi, i’ve been lurking here for a while, but i hope you don’t mind my chiming in. I cycle every day on my way to work and i wear mostly dresses or skirts. As long as they have a back pleat, i have no problems with straight or pencil skirts. In fact, i prefer them to A-line or full skirts which blow open with the slightest breeze. My absolute favorites for biking are straight skirts made of ponte knit. They stay put but are stetchy enough that they don’t inhibit movement at all.

  13. It’s lovely having your own sewing space isn’t it? Sewing is such a messy, untidy activity I love having somewhere I can close the door on once I’ve finished for the day.

    It sounds like you are a much more stylish cyclist than me (really not difficult). I’m sure someone suggested Vogue 1170 for cycling but I can’t remember who. The pattern is fairly straight at the front and full at the back so it would probably work well providing you got the length right (or just accept you have to wear leggings underneath for the ride to work).

    Please let us know what you come up with!

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