I like space clothes: the sort of thing BBC costume designers came up with for 70s and 80s scifi shows. Vogue 1335 definitely fits the description. Unfortunately we don’t have a post-apocalyptic wasteland round here to use as a backdrop for photos, so my garden will have to do.



The original looks like this:

Vogue 1335 envelope art

Finishing this project coincided with one of the UK’s rare heatwaves. I’m wearing this with my Vogue 1378 neoprene leggings and a black wool jersey top derived from Burda 122-4-2011. And I’m melting. The jacket shell fabric is wool.



Here’s the back. It holds its shape pretty well. The diameter at the waist is actually greater than at the hem on this design.





This is meant to be an oversized style but the sleeves in particular are very long. I added the usual two inches to the length that I always do with Vogue patterns and ended up removing it again. I also added two inches to the body length, which again I normally do, and that was about the right amount.



The pockets are very roomy.



They’re pretty high upon the body, but I think it works with the design.



The fasteners are a little bit fiddly! I’m glad I didn’t need the internal snaps that were on the pattern as well as external fasteners.



Not such a good picture of the jacket, but I like the Doctor Who monster pose. And it’s about the only shot I have where any of the lining is visible. The lining fabric is a heavy poly satin that just adds to the insulation factor.



So there it is. I’ll have to wait until the end of summer to wear this for real, but I’m really pleased with the result.




Warning: picture-heavy post ahead. This is my last post about constructing Vogue 1335, which I started sewing way back in March. Hopefully I’ll get some pictures of it in action soon.

Vogue’s version of this style has optional tab closures made from scraps of leather and poppers. The pattern also has marking for snaps inside the jacket which are supposed to provide the real closure mechanism. The tabs are just decorative.

Vogue 1335 envelope art

I originally wanted to use the tabs on my version, so I made these from some faux leather I got on eBay. However as the project wore on I started to think that the tabs I’d made were a little too yellow against the winter white shell fabric I was using. When I finally came to the stage where the tabs had to be stitched on I decided not to use them and looked for something else.

Tabs for Vogue 1335

Much internet searching and several failed purchases later I acquired these things:

Macculloch and Wallis small trigger lock fasteners

Hammer and rivet tools

The fasteners are from Macculloch and Wallis and at the time of writing are available here. One of the difficulties with finding them was that there doesn’t seem to be a standard name for this type of fastener. Macculloch and Wallis call them ‘trigger lock’ fasteners, but if you google that term you’ll mostly find a slightly different type of gadget intended for attaching straps to handbags. I’ve seen the coat fastener variety called ‘hook and dee’ or ‘fireman’ fasteners on US sites but had no luck finding them for sale under those names.

The rivet setting tools came from Amazon. I also got a pack of extra rivets which provided useful practice material before taking the hammer to my jacket and fasteners.

Rivet tools closeup

The rivets were quite tricky to install. Thumping them with the hammer wasn’t difficult but keeping them straight was. The results aren’t entirely straight and square but luckily that’s not obvious unless you get very close indeed.

Dee loop on Vogue 1335

Hook on Vogue 1335

Vogue 1335 fasteners closeup

One nice and unexpected thing was that it turned out that two external fasteners are enough and I didn’t need to install the internal snaps. I am useless at sewing snaps – they never stay attached for long! I’ve had to reapply the snaps on my Burda coat more than once. This jacket sits perfectly without snaps; probably a testament to all the extra interfacing in it.

Vogue 1335 front on dressform

So that’s it for construction. I’ll try to get some pictures of the jacket being worn soon.


I said I’d blog about fasteners for the white jacket next, but Vogue have released such a great autumn pattern collection that I want to talk about that instead!

I always start with the designer patterns, because that’s what Vogue is all about. And this time there are not one but two Ralph Rucci patterns. V1404 is a sweet dress (perhaps too sweet for me, but very Rucci) and V1419 an awesome unlined coat. I’d make it in a fairly light fabric and wear it as a winter dress. I was curious about the original styling and looked these up on Ralph Rucci’s collections on style.com The coat is look 1 from the 2013 pre-fall collection and the dress is actually from spring 2013. I wonder if that one was originally intended for the previous Vogue release, where we didn’t get a Rucci at all?

Vogue 1419 pattern photo

There are three patterns with wonderful seaming from Donna Karan and DKNY: V1407, V1408 and V1409. I’m not so keen on Vogue’s fabric choices for these (to be fair to Vogue, V1409 at least is simply imitating the original look), but they would look fabulous made up in contrasting colours of the scuba knit that’s everywhere at the moment. The original V1408 is made up in different shades of blue – at least I think so, it’s hidden under a jacket in the fashion show. I couldn’t find the original V1407 at all.

Vogue Donna Karan seam detail designs

The fourth Donna Karan design, V1417 is a dramatic but very wearable asymmetric top and trousers combo. I’m not totally sold on the use of knit fabric for the trousers though. You’d need something with a good deal of lycra to avoid bagging.

Vogue 1417 pattern photo

And it doesn’t end there. Look at this wonderful dress from Mizono, V1410. It has an elastic drawstring allowing the length to be adjusted. Perfect for cycling. This is the sort of interesting detail that is the reason I use so many Vogue patterns.

Vogue 1410 envelope pictures

And talking of interesting details, check out V9035, the Marci Tilton pattern. The pockets are something you won’t see anywhere else.

Vogue 9035 envelope pocket detail

I could go on much longer, but the last one I want to highlight is V1405. At first it looks like a simple batwing knit dress. But read the description: draped midriff with stays and (p)urchased elastic, slides and rings for shoulder straps on bodice lining. There’s some internal structure there that would make it an interesting sew.

So that’s the designer section. What about the rest?

Easy Options has a blouse with cuff and placket variations and a princess seam dress with sleeve, collar, and skirt varations this time around. While I seem to have seen similar things to both before, they’re both nice styles and both rated Easy. I’d certainly have gone for the dress if I didn’t already have a few patterns like it.

Very Easy Vogue has some gems. There are stylish tops, jackets, and dresses. Some have subtle details that raise them above the ordinary, such as the unusual slightly set back shoulder seams on V9028, the side seams on V9026, and the curved shoulder yokes on V9019. Although I have to say my favourites are the simple but effective V9038 cape and the batwing dress V9021.

Vogue 9021 envelope art

The regular Vogue patterns seem a little too grown up for me this time around, although they continue a lot of the themes seen in the other sections. There’s an asymmetric dress V9024. V9031 is a skirt with seam detail reminiscent of the Donna Karan designs, but being a skirt rather than a dress it’s probably more wearable. And there are two very traditional patterns for little girls, V9042 and V9043 and an interesting man’s jacket in V9041.

The vintage patterns are conspicuous by their absence in this release which surprises me as 40s and 50s designs still seem to be everywhere in blogland. I’m not keen on wearing styles from those eras myself but there are plenty of people who are! I hope Vogue aren’t discontinuing this range for good. I’d love it if they re-released some of their sixties and seventies styles.

So in summary, Best Vogue Release Ever. And now I just have to wait until they come out in the UK!


It’s been a long time but I never gave up on Vogue 1335. Here’s a peek at the finished item.

Vogue 1335 on dressform

And here’s the original Vogue pattern photo. It’s a Guy Laroche design from Vogue’s autumn 2012 release.

Vogue 1335 envelope art

I’ve stuck fairly closely to Vogue’s interpretation of Marcel Marongiu’s vision (fasteners aside, of which more another time). However I don’t think the pattern as written has nearly enough interfacing to produce the rounded shape in the pattern photo. Vogue has you interface the facings and neckband only. I ended up interfacing the lot: the body, bands, welts and facings in fusible canvas; the sleeves in Vilene G405. I thought canvas might be a little heavy for the sleeves. Originally I wasn’t quite sure what to use for those. Normally I choose interfacings by going to John Lewis and having a feel of the different weights available, but my local branch seems to be reducing its range and I couldn’t find anything that seemed suitable when I visited. Clearly I was going to have to risk buying interfacing online. I picked out Vilene G405 after a detailed perusal of the options on the Vlieseline website – which incidentally is a fascinating read for a sewing geek. G405 is obviously one of Vlieseline’s less popular products because I could only find one online shop selling it in the UK: Moresewing on eBay. But one is enough. The fusible canvas (picture below) came from John Lewis – I hope they don’t stop stocking that!

John Lewis fusible canvas

I wanted to cut all the interfacing without seam allowances so I made separate pattern pieces for interfacing rather than simply cutting out the shell pieces again in fusible. It took forever to make the extra pattern pieces but it was worth it. I’d rather cut extra pattern pieces than fight with fusible that’s slightly too big for the piece I’m fusing to.

I think the sleeves worked out OK. They have the rounded shape from the pattern photo even without arms in them. With hindsight I think it would have been fine if I’d just used the canvas for the sleeves, but I’m glad to have discovered the Vlieseline website as it’ll take some of the guesswork out of buying interfacing online in the future.

Next time: a shaggy dog story about fasteners.


Tabs and snaps

12Apr14

I spent some time looking for suitable closures for the jacket I’m making, Vogue 1335. The original pattern calls for home-made leather tabs with snaps applied to them. I wasn’t sure I’d be able to produce anything like that so spent a lot of time searching for toggles, buckles, and the like online.

Vogue 1335 envelope art

I completely failed to find anything suitable, so tabs it had to be. I got these scraps of cream-coloured ‘leather’ from eBay. I very much doubt it’s real leather but it’s the right colour and texture.
Leather scraps from eBay
John Lewis supplied a pack of 10mm snaps and pliers for applying them. Those things are fiddly. Here’s my first, rather wonky attempt.

Wonky snaps

I did better after drawing a lot of guidelines on the wrong side of the leather.

Top tabs

The smaller tabs weren’t so successful. 10mm snaps are a little bit too large so it was difficult to position the second snap without catching the first one in the pliers.

Bottom tabs

But they don’t look too bad when fastened.

Finished tabs

Of course it could all still go wrong because I’ve got to top-stitch them to the jacket yet.


I’m still making Vogue 1335, the slightly mad Guy Laroche jacket from autumn 2012. It looks like a fairly straightforward sew at first sight.

Vogue 1335 line art

But did you notice the top-stitching? It’s something like an inch to the side of the seamlines. Normally I’d top-stitch by lining the seamline up with something on the sewing machine’s presser foot, which works nicely for regular top-stitching of 1/4″ or less. But no presser foot is two inches wide.

What I’ve been doing is using my Elna’s quilting guide, which is a metal rod that slots into the back of the machine’s shank. It bends down at one end to rest on the fabric. The idea is that you slide it over to the width you want and line up the original seamline or stitching line with the quiet guide. Only mine doesn’t really work out of the box; it fits so loosely that it moves around as soon as I start to sew. A little paper and sellotape cured that though.

Sewing machine with quilt guide wrapped in paper

Paper wrapped quilt guide from the side

And here we have reasonably straight one inch top-stitching. There are welt pockets too. I already blogged about making welt pockets and these are exactly the same as the last lot so I didn’t take any construction pictures this time. Very pleased with how they have come out though.

Vogue 1335 construction: jacket front

Vogue 1335 top-stitching closeup

Hopefully now I’ve done the pockets and worked out how to do the top-stitching the rest will be simple. There are a couple of inset corners on the neckband but I can’t see any difficult bits apart from that.


It doesn’t seem five minutes since the spring Vogue pattern release and now the summer patterns are out. As usual they aren’t available in the UK yet but that never stops me picking my favourites.

The designer section is strangely samey this time around: it’s one sweetly feminine dress after another. If that appeals, there are plenty of interesting variations to choose from. Want scallops? 1398 has you covered. Peplum? See 1399. Lace? Try 1393. Pleats and a button back? 1394, although making it up in a splashy print as in the photo below completely hides the details.

Vogue 1394 envelope photo

If you’re not into sweet and feminine there are a couple of edgier styles. DKNY has a throwback to the eighties in 1396 (and for the avoidance of doubt, that is a good thing.)

Vogue 1396 envelope photo

And Guy Laroche has an unusual shirtdress, 1400. I’m not convinced by the pockets over the bust, but look at the cut-out shoulders and the bands. I recommend clicking through to the Vogue website because the back view is good as well. Now if only we get a summer this year.
Vogue 1400 envelope photo

There are two new Vintage Vogue patterns: 9000 is a cute shirt-styled dress, and 8999 is a dress with a fabric hogging 20 gore skirt. You’re going to need about six metres of wide fabric to make it, but the end result will be spectacular. The pattern includes a bolero, but Vogue didn’t photograph it.

Vogue 8999 envelope photo

There are two Sandra Betzina Today’s Fit patterns. 1390 is seriously tempting. The shape is unusual and I love the pintucked version. I’m showing the line art because Vogue only photographed the plain one. I wonder about the fabric options though: linen, silk, cotton stretch wovens, knits, soft leathers or suedes. So, pretty much anything at all then?

Vogue 1390 line art

The Easy Options patterns are solid as usual. Two more very feminine dress patterns, and unusually a 9008 is a pair of shorts. At first sight the shorts don’t seem to have many variations but you can have pleat front or flat front, back yoke or darts, and two types of pocket.

Very Easy Vogue is the most interesting section. There are lots and lots of pretty dresses, but also some more unusual styles. 8996 admittedly is yet another pretty dress, but it has pockets. 8994 is an original shape. And 8992 is an interesting take on the wrap dress.

Vogue 8992 pattern photo

As for the rest? There’s a Claire Shaeffer Custom Couture jacket, which is not for me but is sure to delight many other people. The regular Vogues have a couple of great tops in 8991 and 9004

Vogue 9006 envelope art

Overall it’s a very girly collection, big on puffy skirts and tiny waists. But for those of us who prefer other silhouettes there are one or two options in there. And major kudos to Vogue for providing more finished garment measurements on the envelope. All the ones I looked at had at least bust and hip measurements. It makes such a difference when you don’t have to unfold the tissue to choose your size.

I thought this would be a popular collection- everyone loves a dress after all – but the overall reaction I’ve seen so far has been lukewarm. What did you think of this one?




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